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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
and a way that you build up and make a stronger america. with reference to civil rights, i think you have to go beyond that. i think if you look at my record in the congress and fritz mondale's, we both have extremely strong civil rights records. this administration does not. it has come in, in the bob jones ' case, on the side of segregated academies. it came in on the side of discrimination against women, the handicapped, and the elderly. as a matter of fact, in the congress we just passed overwhelmingly the civil rights bill of 1984 in this republican-controlled senate killed it in the last week or two in congress. so there is a real difference how the mondale-ferraro will address the issue of civil rights, particularly in that area. >> in the area of affirmative action, what steps do you think government can take to increase the representation of women and minorities in the work force and in colleges and universities? specifically would you support the use of quotas to achie those goals? >> i do not support the use of quotas. mr. mondale and i feel strongly that affirmative action to
filibuster in opposition to the civil rights act of 1957 and his movement from the democrat to the republican party in 1964. this is about 45 minutes. >> i want to talk to you today about my book, "strom thurmond's america" and i want to begin by telling you a story, a strom thurmond story and when you go and you do research in south carolina and you go into the archives to see what you are interested in about, you tell them strom thurmond and they say let me tell you my story about strom thurmond. that time they did something for him or they time they saw him do something crazy. my story about strom thurmond begins in late july, 1992 and i am on a flight from washington d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an internet intern that summer off on capitol hill and one of my regrets of the summer was that i had never seen strom thurmond because all of my fellow mentor said you have got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him and i did not know what they meant really. but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and i look ahead in front of me and i see a man who h
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
in differences of civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week over town, the best thing that george bush is that he is not ronald reagan. >> largely as result of policies and priorities of the reagan administration, more people are becoming poorer and staying for than any time since world war ii. >> if there's anything left of ronald reagan's trickle-down theory, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickling down to just about every segment of our society. >> if you gave clarence thomas all little flower, you would think -- here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. >> i hope his wife feeds him mustard eggs and butter and he dies like many black men, of heart disease. that so i feel. he is a reprehensible person. >> you call to gingrich in your words trickle down terrorists who face their agenda on division, exclusion and fear. you think middle-class americans need protection from that group? >> the new republican majority took a big step today on the legislative agenda, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
to tolerance and civility? "fox & friends" starts right now. >> gretchen: good morning, everyone. hope you're gonna have a great tuesday. the whole gang is back today. welcome back, brian to you. >> steve: did you have a nice day off? >> brian: yes, i did. >> steve: what did you do? >> brian: i spent it with my italian side of the family. i told my irish to stay away. we're going to celebrate the great explorer. i'm talking about columbus. >> steve: congratulations. >> brian: special thanks to columbus because i'm loving it here in america. >> gretchen: okay. let's get right to your headlines this morning because we're just one day now from a house oversight committee hearing on the terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. colonel andy wood, the former head of a special forces security team, will testify. he's already said the state department ignored pleas for extra security at the u.s. consulate. more evidence emerging that the obama administration knew within one day the attack was likely terrorism. fox news learning patrick f. kennedy, a top aide to secretary of state hillar
. >> they do that, don't they, with torture? right. does that make it better? >> criminal is very different from civil. and what we -- the precise argument we are making here is that the presumption against application of u.s. law to conduct within foreign sovereigns -- and remember, the purpose of the presumption, justice scalia, is to avoid conflict with foreign sovereigns. there is no foreign sovereign over the high seas. the conflict arises, and the presumption protects against this conflict, when we go into a foreign nation, we project our law. >> i understand that. that's the worst. but i really don't -- you appeal to the general principle of territoriality of our laws. and, as i say, i don't know any other case where that principle allows our securities laws to be applied on the high seas, for example -- >> well -- >> even though they can apply in australia. >> your honor, if you wish to say no extraterritorial application, we think sosa does not foreclose that, because sosa simply said piracy might be one of the actions covered. but i want to get back to the key point, which is -- >
universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in a person in february. now what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threatened those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand we've seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. the democratically elected leaders and free people in the arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is way too soon to see how these transitions will play out. but what is not in doubt is that america has a big stake in the outcome. last month at the united nations general assembly in new york, i met with leaders from across the region. and i told each of them that the united states will continue to pursue a strategy to support emerging democracies as they were to provide effective security grounded and the rule will fall to spur economic growth and bolster space institutions. we have made those three priorities the hallmark of america's
sending americans to do the job but fewer of them. >> biden: that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to the civil war in syria. 25,000 to 30,000 people have now been killed. president obama explained the military action taken by libya, by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> biden: it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population that is libya. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war. it would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and if in fact it blows up and the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region. we are working hand and glove with the turks, the jar dannians, the saudis and all of the people in the region. attempting to identify the people who deserve the help so whe
the job. >> no, we're sending americans to do the job, fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending more afghans to do the job. more afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria, where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya. one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. you would not see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. are you in a count you are in a country that is heavily populated, in the most dangerous area in the world. and if, in fact, it blows up, the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we're working hand in glove with the turks,
's right. we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria. there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of the last year, president obama explainedded the military action taken in sirria, saying it was in national interest to go in. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it is a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population-- that is, libya. one-fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's in a part of the world where you're not going to see whatever would come from that war. it would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midof the most dangerous area in the world. and in fact, in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand in glove with the turks, with the jordanians, with the saudis and with all the people in the region, attempting to identify the pe
, but fewer of them. biden: that's right. we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> moderator: let's move to another war, the civil war in syria where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? biden: different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libya, one-fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's a part of the world where they're not going to see whatever would come from that war seep into a regional war. you're in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world. and, in fact, if, in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the t
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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